半音階專區

黃金海飛茲在slidemeister (半音階討論區)的討論 [2003/9/19]
我的(黃金海飛茲)特製口琴吹嘴最近上國外的半音階口琴討論區公佈(之前已有許多人在問我,並期待看到照片),並已在我的網站公佈這款口琴及吹嘴照片,請至 www.yentzu.idv.tw 點選 The New Century's Super Chromonica.

由於我曾誇口說這把琴將使所有的高價琴驚惶失色,以致引來一個製造特殊半音階的老先生反彈,不過還好,Rennaissance 的製造者,也是SPAH的理事長Dauglas Tate先生的反應甚為理性。我們的討論還被另一位網友Gus讚賞為:「當東方碰到西方,美極了」(When East meets West, beautiful)。

新加坡的華人網友則對我的這個設計推崇備製,視之為解決半音階口琴漏氣問題的唯一方法。馬來西亞的口琴界的一位日本先生更向我訂製了全套的口琴,包括我尚未製作出來的鋁合金琴座。

下面是我在slidemaster討論區所寫的文章及所收到的回應。對半音階有興趣研究的琴友委曲大家多查字典了:

Hi, Everybody. Long time no see.

I've been pretty busy these days so I haven't followed closely the thread

about the perfect slide. Fortunately, my ideal "perfect slide" has just been

out of the plating factory recently and I just had some friend photo it with

his digital camera yesterday. Please see the attached picture files for it.

To me at least, this will be what makes the Hohner 16 chromonica a real

instrument. No air waste. Full sonorous sound from all 4 octaves. (In fact,

it is only with this instrument that one can play that famous prelude of

Bach's unaccompanied cell suite - No. 1 in G major - I believe even Franz

Chmel will be no exception). Beautiful, thicker and mellower tone. The

volume in the lower two octaves is about three times as loud as that of a

regular super 64, and two times in the higher octaves. I figure you won't

need amplication to play it in a classroom of 60 to 100. It immediately

pales all high-priced chromonicas into insignificance. And I am pretty sure

that with a gold plated aluminium alloy comb, it can sound as loud as a

flute, making it a full-fledged chamber music instrument.

Besides, the elevated thicker mouthpiece makes it easier for one to play

octaves and longer intervals involving tongue switching techniques. You will

no longer need to bite those uncomfortably thick cakes such as the Super 64X

to play octaves and intervals.

I've applied for a patent for it and do hope to sell the baby to Hohner. If

any of you guys know Hohner people please refer me to them. Before that, I

think I can take a few orders to make my life a little easier. The set is

currently 280 and super 64 compatible. But I believe (I should say: I am

pretty sure) that Hohner wouldn't want to make it that way, if they were to

buy the patent.

The set is now being sold at US$280/set with 24k gold plating. Gold plated

aluminium alloy combs are also offered at the price of US$300. All three

parts are precision machine made and EDMed.

Regards,

Yentzu

新加坡 唐先生回應:

Dear Sir,

I read about your article about the mouthpeice

that can fixed a super 64, can allowed to the player

to play Bach !

I have been practice Bach cello suite for many

years, I play No 1, No 2 and No 3.

Of course I cant play all the movements.

It require a lot of practiace and special

technique.

One of the reason is my masterklass still not in

a perfect condition.

1. A lot of air waste.

2. The wind saver give problem.

3. Some reed respond slow . May be I should say

the reeds respond is not event.

4. Push buttom take to long time to respond.

I understand that you can make montpeice for

Super 64.

Can you make one for masterklass ?

I have two masterklass, one is 1987 made and the

other is 2001 made.

Can you give me suggestion about my problems

above ?

Thank You,

regards,

Victor Tang

Singapore.

下面是一位特殊口琴製造者 Vern Smith 的回應:

The skeptical old curmudgeon emerges from his lair, aroused by the odor of

b-you-know-what wafting across the internet.

----- Original Message -----

From: "yentzu"

> ........volume in the lower two octaves is about three times as loud as

that of a

> regular super 64, and two times in the higher octaves. I figure you won't

> need amplication to play it in a classroom of 60 to 100. It immediately

> pales all high-priced chromonicas into insignificance.

This is a very extravagant claim....too extravagant to be accepted without a

convincing explanation and objective evidence.

A reed of a given size operating at a given air pressure produces sound

having a corresponding loudness and tone that goes directly from the reed to

the listener's ear. You can produce this sound by placing your lips

directly on a reedplate and blowing/drawing with no harmonica there at all!

There is nothing in the structure of the harmonica such as resonance, that

can alter the sound in any important way. Reducing air leakage makes the

instrument more responsive and easier to play...an effect noticed more by

the player than the listener. However the change in air leakage from "good

enough" to "none" will not affect the perceived loudness of the harp.

> And I am pretty sure

> that with a gold plated aluminium alloy comb, it can sound as loud as a

> flute, making it a full-fledged chamber music instrument.

There is no theory or evidence that supports the notion that comb material

has the slightest effect on sound/tone.

> Besides, the elevated thicker mouthpiece makes it easier for one to play

> octaves and longer intervals involving tongue switching techniques. You

will

> no longer need to bite those uncomfortably thick cakes such as the Super

64X

> to play octaves and intervals.

This is a plausible claim to make for a mouthpiece of unique design...but

yet to be demonstrated.

Take some advice from an old mouthpiece inventor. Bring your harp to a

convention and demonstrate it to the public. If it works for real players,

then it will sell itself without exaggerated claims. That's what the makers

of the Renaissance did. That's what I did with my Hands-Free-Chromatic

mouthpiece. That is what you should do too!

Vern

下面是我的回應:

> The skeptical old curmudgeon emerges from his lair, aroused by the odor of

> b-you-know-what wafting across the internet.

Dear Vern, I have no background in physical theory. All what I know comes

from experience and experiment.

> This is a very extravagant claim....too extravagant to be accepted without

a

> convincing explanation and objective evidence.

True. They way I did it was a little too commercial. But half of my

statement is really about the value vs. price side which I didn't make

clear. The M/S set just presents a new idea: a top-notch chromonica doesn't

have to be UNAFFORDABLE. You can have one d-i-y. (Depending on your likes,

you can choose to fit it with single-deck or double-deck reedplates and

whatever-material combs.)

It is not that I've never had the idea of buying an expensive chromonica

such as the ones mentioned above. But Taiwan is a rather small place where

virtually everyone who plays the chromonica knows whoever else plays what.

Most of us have the luck of knowing what a silver concerto, a pollet, or an

amdeus plays like whithout having to buy one. Unlike in western societies

where people are vigilant against contagion, in this country people

generally are willing to let their "good" friends try their harmonicas. And

that's why I have spent so much time looking for a "ideal chromonica" and

eventually came to design it on my own.

> A reed of a given size operating at a given air pressure produces sound

> having a corresponding loudness and tone that goes directly from the reed

to

> the listener's ear. You can produce this sound by placing your lips

> directly on a reedplate and blowing/drawing with no harmonica there at

all!

> There is nothing in the structure of the harmonica such as resonance, that

> can alter the sound in any important way. Reducing air leakage makes the

> instrument more responsive and easier to play...an effect noticed more by

> the player than the listener. However the change in air leakage from

"good

> enough" to "none" will not affect the perceived loudness of the harp.

Probably everything significant on this planet accquires signifciance

through process insignifcant and inperceivable. The other day a pretty old

guy on the street stopped me and ventured a guess: "You might be my high

schoolmate". After verification it somewhat broke my heart. It has never

occurred to me throughout these years that I am already that old. Weep.

The magnitude of vibration of the reeds is the main factor that affects a

note's loudness. And the strength, pressure, and velocity of air flow is the

main force behind the magnitude of vibration. And the strength, pressure,

and velocity of air flow are affected to some extent by the size of the M/S

hole and the room inside the mouthpiece. This is particularly true on the

lower registers of the chromonica.

In my opinion, reed performance not counted, the factors that affect the

loudness of the chromonica, according to their importance, would be:

1. cover shape and material; 2. mouthpiece and slide hole size and material;

3. comb size and material. Each of the three counts. And adding together

they count more than the human factor alone.

> > And I am pretty sure

> > that with a gold plated aluminium alloy comb, it can sound as loud as a

> > flute, making it a full-fledged chamber music instrument.

>

> There is no theory or evidence that supports the notion that comb material

> has the slightest effect on sound/tone.

Not only does the comb material affect the tone, but the slide material does

too. I've experimented with three mateirals for my slide: brass, aluminium,

and acrylic. Brass is too heavy, and the acrylic dampens the tone.

Everything affects something sometime somewhere to some degree. It makes no

sense trying to single out just one thing and tell what's missing.

> > Besides, the elevated thicker mouthpiece makes it easier for one to play

> > octaves and longer intervals involving tongue switching techniques. You

> will

> > no longer need to bite those uncomfortably thick cakes such as the Super

> 64X

> > to play octaves and intervals.

>

> This is a plausible claim to make for a mouthpiece of unique design...but

> yet to be demonstrated.

>

> Take some advice from an old mouthpiece inventor. Bring your harp to a

> convention and demonstrate it to the public. If it works for real

players,

> then it will sell itself without exaggerated claims. That's what the

makers

> of the Renaissance did.

Good diplomacy, Vern.

That's what I did with my Hands-Free-Chromatic

> mouthpiece. That is what you should do too!

>

> Vern

Advice heeded. But my father is on sick bed and, I am afraid, can hardly be

expected to get well again. I doubt I can afford the luxury of traveling in

the next few years.

下面是SPAH理事長Dauglas T的回應:

>The skeptical old curmudgeon emerges from his lair, aroused by the odor of

>b-you-know-what wafting across the internet.

Beware! :))

>From: "yentzu"

>

> > ........volume in the lower two octaves is about three times as loud as

>that of a

> > regular super 64, and two times in the higher octaves.

>

>This is a very extravagant claim....

Agreed.

>too extravagant to be accepted without a

>convincing explanation and objective evidence.

>

>A reed of a given size operating at a given air pressure produces sound

>having a corresponding loudness and tone that goes directly from the reed to

>the listener's ear. You can produce this sound by placing your lips

>directly on a reedplate and blowing/drawing with no harmonica there at all!

>There is nothing in the structure of the harmonica such as resonance, that

>can alter the sound in any important way.

> Reducing air leakage makes the instrument more responsive and easier to

> play...an effect noticed more by

>the player than the listener. However the change in air leakage from "good

>enough" to "none" will not affect the perceived loudness of the harp.

Sorry, I do not agree at all.

Funnily enough this is something I have been concentrating on in the last

few weeks.

YOU ought to know that it isn't true because of your hands free

instrument... where you make claims because there is 'no' leakage with your

system :))

If the amount of air escaping down the slide is a significant portion of

the amount going to the reed ( to put it in loose terms) and you reduce

that significant amount there is going to be an effect... and it is easily

demonstrable. I have two mouthpieces for my own instrument. They were

identical except for the mouth profile (another experiment). There was a

small difference in perceived sound which I put down to the different

placing of the instrument in the mouth. In other words they were sensibly

the same.

For an experiment I made the slider air gap in one about 0.001 - 0.0015"

smaller. The resulting difference in perceived volume was quite

astounding. So much so that I went back and checked all the other

parameters to see if i had altered anything else. Weirdly enough the main

difference was in the lower notes!

I believe, and I can't confirm this yet, that part of the increase in

volume is due to the more efficient way you can start the reed and get it

swinging. The majority of players start reeds inefficiently and therefore

never achieve the true potential of volume with them.

> > And I am pretty sure

> > that with a gold plated aluminium alloy comb, it can sound as loud as a

> > flute, making it a full-fledged chamber music instrument.

>

>There is no theory or evidence that supports the notion that comb material

>has the slightest effect on sound/tone.

I disagree with that as you know... however I do not believe that having

gold plating or an aluminium comb can alter the volume level to that

extent... there are other factors which are helped by the stability of a

metal comb (of any metal)which help to make for a louder instrument as we

have often discussed in this and other forums.

> > Besides, the elevated thicker mouthpiece makes it easier for one to play

> > octaves and longer intervals involving tongue switching techniques. You

>will

> > no longer need to bite those uncomfortably thick cakes such as the Super

>64X

> > to play octaves and intervals.

>

>This is a plausible claim to make for a mouthpiece of unique design...but

>yet to be demonstrated.

MP shape by itself in combination with a standard body is, at best

something to alleviate pain. However, an elevated mouthpiece which takes

you away from the cover shape can have distinct advantages.... and also

distinct disadvantages. :))

>Take some advice from an old mouthpiece inventor. Bring your harp to a

>convention and demonstrate it to the public. If it works for real players,

>then it will sell itself without exaggerated claims.

Absolutely. There is one person I know who makes some ridiculous claims

about his instrument in public and on the net. Having played said

instrument and found that it does not come up to the claims by a long chalk

I was very disappointed. If the same instrument had been demonstrated and

tried without the silly claims then a much more favourable impression might

have been made.

No, I won't say who or which instrument.

> That's what I did with my Hands-Free-Chromatic

>mouthpiece.

Yes, you did.. and a very good instrument it is too.

That having been said... please go to the website and have a look at the

slider. It is a very interesting design, rather like the CBH double ramp

slider but with straight sides ( I think). Will love to hear it.

====================

Yentzu says

Please come to my homepage http://www.yentzu.idv.tw/

and click on "The New Century's Super Chromonica" for the picture.

====================

Having said that... I always come back to the adage my partner in harmonica

crime, Bobbie Giordano, beats into me at every available opportunity...

SIMPLE is GOOD ... and ... Form follows function

There is not a lot wrong with the VERY simple idea used for hundreds of

years on church organs and millions of harmonicas for a slider... a simple

bar in a simple slot.

MADE WELL this takes a LOT of beating.

(You ain't seen nothing until you have handled a 16 foot long Organ slider

made of beautifully polished and dimensioned wood!! and the organ can have

20 - 30 of them... or more!)

Douglas t

再來則是我的回應:

Dear Daug,

Can you give some examples of what may be the "distinct disadvantages" of

having an elevated mouthpiece which takes you away from the cover? It is

true that when I was groping for an "ideal design" what I thought of most

was invariably my own playing style. That mouthpiece not only save me the

pain of biting the thick cake of a Super 64X when playing octaves, but also

keep my nose from being hit by my fanning left hand when I play Larry Adler

style hand vibrato. Besides, the bigger mouthpiece allows me to use my nasal

muscle without getting too much nasal sound for the note (which is

something I can never do with regular 16 holers), becasue the mouthpiece

itself has a large enough resonnating chamber to neutralize that.

Another big advantage of that mp is that, if you are a serious player, it

allows you to play out of the left corner of the mouth (tongue in the right)

and still get loud enough sound and good enough tone. I believe most players

are much weaker on their left side than on their right. I am no exception.

And that's one major reason why I have to "invent" this mp/slide set.

Necessity is really its mother, I'd say.

Regards,

Yentzu

再來則又是Dauglas T的回應:

>Can you give some examples of what may be the "distinct disadvantages" of

>having an elevated mouthpiece which takes you away from the cover?

When playing at higher speeds a larger mouthpiece inevitably means a larger

amount of air in the system to reverse the pressure with... ie, you will

either have to use a little more effort or be a small amount slower. Yes,

I'm splitting hairs. :))

There are also some interesting resonance effects to do with chamber size

and the overall volume/pathlength to the reed. There was quite abit of

discussion on Harp-l about this some years ago and maybe also on

Sli9demeister, but I don't remember.

>It is

>true that when I was groping for an "ideal design" what I thought of most

>was invariably my own playing style.

That is a great place to start... if you can't redesign for you then you

can't for other people. I would think that the majority of harmonica

innovation was done for personal gain in playing ability rather than the

prospect of vast wealth!!

>That mouthpiece not only save me the

>pain of biting the thick cake of a Super 64X when playing octaves,

The majority of harmonicas are designed for making, not for playing!! They

don't fit the face well.

> but also

>keep my nose from being hit by my fanning left hand when I play Larry Adler

>style hand vibrato.

Now THAT is a new one. Thank you :)))

> Besides, the bigger mouthpiece allows me to use my nasal

>muscle without getting too much nasal sound for the note (which is

>something I can never do with regular 16 holers), becasue the mouthpiece

>itself has a large enough resonnating chamber to neutralize that.

Interesting... haven't thought or heard of that as a solution.

>Another big advantage of that mp is that, if you are a serious player, it

>allows you to play out of the left corner of the mouth (tongue in the right)

>and still get loud enough sound and good enough tone.

Hmmm, I think that, in general, that would be regarded as a matter of

learning the technique. Or,at least, I would have said that afew weeks

ago. Some recent experiments lead me to believe that there are alterations

you can make to the MP which allows for easier intervals, larger reach and

easier left hand tone control (but the LH control really is a matter of

technique and time)

> I believe most players

>are much weaker on their left side than on their right. I am no exception.

>And that's one major reason why I have to "invent" this mp/slide set.

>Necessity is really its mother, I'd say.

Thank you for this honest breakdown of why you came up with your ideas.

May I cordially suggest that, if you are applying for a patent you take the

picture off your website and get your claims in as soon as possible without

giving any more details away. My own dealings with big harmonica firms and

ideas gives me little confidence in them. Your idea of it as an add on kit

is great. I look forward to hearing a lot more of your exploits

Douglas t

以下則又是唐先生寄來的回應:

Dear Yentzu,

Thanks for your reply.

Now I am sure that I am not the only person who

playing Bach suite.

Yes, 64 is a better instrument to play Bach

suite.( on it lower register).

But I already have two masterklass... I must made

full use to it ,and upgrade it parts.To make it my

instrument.

I have Hohner 64 and Suzuki 16 holes... but I dont

like it and not well mastered thre lower register.

From the picture, I can tell your design is a best

solution to all harmonica players.

Hope you doing well in you business.You no need to

sell the design to Hohner.. many people will order

from you.

But too bad it is not for my masterklass.

Hope to see you in Hong Kong...

I am also planning to visit the ...

All the best .

regards

Tang Yuen Wai

© 2003 顏子英漢書院 All rights reserved.版權所有
郵政劃撥帳號:郵局代號:700 局號:2441362 帳號:1988992
匯款帳戶:彰化銀行代號:009 帳號:51855170292500
地址:台北縣瑞芳鎮岳王路 17 號